Keep it Fresh. Keep it EZ.

EZ designin & n.y.c. livin.

www.INEZGALVEZ.com

Love Culture and Widen Your Scope.

Loving the little details: from conch shells and sea-stars piled out of view, distressed grain on naturally, cured wood panels, meticulous handwork and folkart designs, to a nonchalance interaction with crustaceans. You just don’t see that every day.

Bahamas. 

Bahamas: From Dusk to Dawn Series


I was going through my Bahamas pictures the other day and came across the night pics. We were walking through the Seafood Market in Nassau that was set alongside the ocean. Tried their specialty dish, Fried Conch, sat in an open aired patio and people-watched. Flares of light bounced off their pasteled walls, creating orbs of humid, neon air. It was bright and I’m glad I was able to catch it on camera. There’s definitely a Bahamian edge that made tropical island chillin’ different than any other place. 

So here are bits and pieces of that scene. This night inspired my Summer colors by the way. Bright, neon, and loud!  Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Bahamian Street Art .
When traveling, I make sure to look for the street art because it’s a great way to learn about the culture. It’s all about context. I mean, you wouldn’t see this in NY and the subject matter wouldn’t usually have palm tree outlines, an island print, and a different language tagged on a wall. The colors are used differently too; a bright orange wall contrasting a Caribbean blue sky. If you walk around the local neighborhoods, you’ll notice their bright choice of color on Westernized architecture. Some buildings are neon coral with dark brown window shutters. You don’t see that everyday. 
Travel.  ’Cable Beach’ in the Bahamas View high resolution

Bahamian Street Art .

When traveling, I make sure to look for the street art because it’s a great way to learn about the culture. It’s all about context. I mean, you wouldn’t see this in NY and the subject matter wouldn’t usually have palm tree outlines, an island print, and a different language tagged on a wall. The colors are used differently too; a bright orange wall contrasting a Caribbean blue sky. If you walk around the local neighborhoods, you’ll notice their bright choice of color on Westernized architecture. Some buildings are neon coral with dark brown window shutters. You don’t see that everyday. 

Travel.  ’Cable Beach’ in the Bahamas

Bahamian gate (Taken with instagram)
Print worthy inspiration and texture View high resolution

Bahamian gate (Taken with instagram)

Print worthy inspiration and texture

Evening attire (Taken with instagram)
Keeping it airy and bright for warm nights and sand under my feet. Care-free has never felt any better. 
Bright printed gown and wide brimmed straw hat out of Bahamian markets View high resolution

Evening attire (Taken with instagram)

Keeping it airy and bright for warm nights and sand under my feet. Care-free has never felt any better. 

Bright printed gown and wide brimmed straw hat out of Bahamian markets

Bahama lovin on a lil gettaway #travel #fashion #ss12  (Taken with instagram) View high resolution

Bahama lovin on a lil gettaway #travel #fashion #ss12 (Taken with instagram)

Tropical vegetation shading us can also inspire a pretty sick print! Lol #travel (Taken with instagram) View high resolution

Tropical vegetation shading us can also inspire a pretty sick print! Lol #travel (Taken with instagram)

More Turkey and Greek Finds

I know I should have posted this closer to my other Turkish posts, but I got a little bit lazy. Ooops :)

The blue, black, tan and white graphic find is actually a cushion made of lambskin. The color combo and bold graphic are so emphatic, esp coming from the remote area in Ephesus, I had to get it. Check out the first picture with the lambskin detail and stitching. Now I just need to stuff it with foam, then it’ll have a purpose other than looking pretty. :D On top of the cushion is a leather satchel with Greek figures artistically embossed in the leather. I also love how the buckle and strap are designed to be on the bottom of the bag. It’s works well with the shape and let’s you enjoy the artwork. 

FINALLY back home in New York,
but I still don’t feel like I settled back down from all the traveling. Oh well, let’s toast in L.E.S. tonight!
Photo taken: Lower East Side, NYC. Ludlow St.  View high resolution

FINALLY back home in New York,

but I still don’t feel like I settled back down from all the traveling. Oh well, let’s toast in L.E.S. tonight!

Photo taken: Lower East Side, NYC. Ludlow St. 

 
Outside of Hagia Sophia
During the time of Constantine, the building was a Cathedral and then a Basilica. Outside of the building nowadays, you see the bits of ruins around it. These are closeups of the old, ruined walls and pillars. Beautiful, detailed carvings that must’ve taken forever. Sad how many people over look these things.  View high resolution

Outside of Hagia Sophia

During the time of Constantine, the building was a Cathedral and then a Basilica. Outside of the building nowadays, you see the bits of ruins around it. These are closeups of the old, ruined walls and pillars. Beautiful, detailed carvings that must’ve taken forever. Sad how many people over look these things. 

Inside the Hagia Sophia
One of the coolest buildings I went to in Istanbul.
It was once an Orthodox Cathedral, Basilica, and a Mosque. Walking around, you can really see each transformation the building had gone through. From fresh Muslim script hanging off balconies to Christian mosaics of icons peeling off walls, it was unbelievable seeing it all under one beautiful roof.  It was a different world, like  2 of the most popular religions and cultures living harmoniously together, rather than clashing against each other.
I wish I could post up all of the photos of the artwork on here, maybe I’ll do another post with more pictures.  View high resolution

Inside the Hagia Sophia

One of the coolest buildings I went to in Istanbul.

It was once an Orthodox Cathedral, Basilica, and a Mosque. Walking around, you can really see each transformation the building had gone through. From fresh Muslim script hanging off balconies to Christian mosaics of icons peeling off walls, it was unbelievable seeing it all under one beautiful roof.  It was a different world, like  2 of the most popular religions and cultures living harmoniously together, rather than clashing against each other.

I wish I could post up all of the photos of the artwork on here, maybe I’ll do another post with more pictures. 

Istanbul’s Social Scene
They always say, the best way to get to know a place’s culture is to dine and drink with the locals. Right after having a Turkish meal and watching professional belly dancers entertain us, my boyfriend and I went around Istanbul with our very good friend, Ezgi. Her and her friend, Aydin, took us out to Taksim Square, the spot with a poppin night scene. 
We started the night drinking Turkish Tea and having great conversation, a social thing to do I guess =P, and smoking Melon Hookah! There’s nothing like Hookah-ing in this exotic land. 
Then we walked through lively alley-ways leading to a million other alley-ways filled with bars, restaurants, and markets. I was seriously lost. Or maybe I was just distracted by markets of fresh fruit and fish and the live Mediterranean and Middle Eastern music at every corner. Why were they open so late anyways? 
We ended the night drinking their local drink, Raki (pronounced Ra-kuh). Raki is a.k.a. ‘Lions Milk’. It is an Apertif that tastes like licorice and actually reminds me of Absinthe. With Raki, the locals would sip slowly while eating cheese and other snacks. A very social drink for not getting WASTED fyi. (ahem: binge-drinking americans haha) They pour Raki in the glasses and add water, which turns the alcohol white. 
More Jeopardy? yah?
Istanbul is originally Constantinople (during the Ottoman Empire)
The Black Sea separates the city into 2, making a part of Istanbul part of Asia and the other side part of Europe.  View high resolution

Istanbul’s Social Scene

They always say, the best way to get to know a place’s culture is to dine and drink with the locals. Right after having a Turkish meal and watching professional belly dancers entertain us, my boyfriend and I went around Istanbul with our very good friend, Ezgi. Her and her friend, Aydin, took us out to Taksim Square, the spot with a poppin night scene. 

We started the night drinking Turkish Tea and having great conversation, a social thing to do I guess =P, and smoking Melon Hookah! There’s nothing like Hookah-ing in this exotic land. 

Then we walked through lively alley-ways leading to a million other alley-ways filled with bars, restaurants, and markets. I was seriously lost. Or maybe I was just distracted by markets of fresh fruit and fish and the live Mediterranean and Middle Eastern music at every corner. Why were they open so late anyways? 

We ended the night drinking their local drink, Raki (pronounced Ra-kuh). Raki is a.k.a. ‘Lions Milk’. It is an Apertif that tastes like licorice and actually reminds me of Absinthe. With Raki, the locals would sip slowly while eating cheese and other snacks. A very social drink for not getting WASTED fyi. (ahem: binge-drinking americans haha) They pour Raki in the glasses and add water, which turns the alcohol white. 

More Jeopardy? yah?

Istanbul is originally Constantinople (during the Ottoman Empire)

The Black Sea separates the city into 2, making a part of Istanbul part of Asia and the other side part of Europe. 

Turkish Bag
I ended up using the bag throughout the trip. It’s that kind of bag and accessory that you can just throw on whenever and pair with anything, well in my opinion. The length was long enough to swing around without hitting anyone and the size is big enough to put all your important traveling necessities. Knowing me, I’d end up cramming my whole life in my bag (Can’t help it, I was an art student for 5 years).  Plus, it’s just a fun accessory.  View high resolution

Turkish Bag

I ended up using the bag throughout the trip. It’s that kind of bag and accessory that you can just throw on whenever and pair with anything, well in my opinion. The length was long enough to swing around without hitting anyone and the size is big enough to put all your important traveling necessities. Knowing me, I’d end up cramming my whole life in my bag (Can’t help it, I was an art student for 5 years).  Plus, it’s just a fun accessory. 

Check out the bags I got from Turkey. The first one I’ve actually had for over a year now from when my mom went last. But since I got the chance to go myself, I had to get another. It’s just a great accessory that flaunts itself.  I just love the shape of the bag, the Medusa eye tassles dangling off the front , and the strap that zips into 2 straps for you can wear as a back pack.
Honestly, I hardly cared about the functionality or if it’s trendy, it was more of about loving that fact that it’s so unique and that it was bought off the streets of Cannakale in Turkey<——that just sounds cooler. =)
More Jeopardy for ya: 
Medusa eye represents Good Luck, so the more you have, the better. If you’re shopping around Greece and Turkey and end up buying a few things, don’t be surprised if the shop owners give a bunch of loose Medusa Eyes as a little travel gift.  View high resolution

Check out the bags I got from Turkey. The first one I’ve actually had for over a year now from when my mom went last. But since I got the chance to go myself, I had to get another. It’s just a great accessory that flaunts itself.  I just love the shape of the bag, the Medusa eye tassles dangling off the front , and the strap that zips into 2 straps for you can wear as a back pack.

Honestly, I hardly cared about the functionality or if it’s trendy, it was more of about loving that fact that it’s so unique and that it was bought off the streets of Cannakale in Turkey<——that just sounds cooler. =)

More Jeopardy for ya:

Medusa eye represents Good Luck, so the more you have, the better. If you’re shopping around Greece and Turkey and end up buying a few things, don’t be surprised if the shop owners give a bunch of loose Medusa Eyes as a little travel gift. 

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